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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

In the last year there have been several studies/stories about the risks associated with benzodiazepine abuse.  And while benzodiazepines have been prescribed for decades to treat anxiety and seizure disorders,  the possible threat of overusing them is real and with that comes dependency, overdose and the potentiality of death.  Did you know that since 2010, there have been 6,507 US drug overdose deaths that involved benzodizepines?  Because of this rising number, FRN created an infographic to help familiarize those about benzodiazepines but most importantly help create awareness regarding the possible addiction with benzodiazepines.

Broken down in four sections, the  infographic (http://www.dualdiagnosis.org/benzodiazepine-addiction/) goes into detail about the following:

- What are benzodiazepines: their brand names and the amount of prescriptions filled in the US in 2011, the number of related ER visits in 2010 and the confiscations by law enforcement for each associated drug.

- Why prescribe benzodiazepines, specifically the disorders that are treated

- Common side effects and contraindications with benzodiazepine use

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Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello And Happy Memorial Weekend Recovery Friends!


 

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Some days living life in recovery can be a bit of a challenge. What I mean is, no matter how much recovery time one gets under their belt, we still may have a day when something from our “Wicked Past Addiction” just might come back and ‘Bitch Slap’ us in the face of our present.
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It’s why it’s important to ALWAYS have a plan. And especially for long holiday weekends like this one, *Memorial Weekend*…

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Even when that “Slap” comes around, we need to have a safe plan to deal with Life on Life’s terms. I mean, our higher power never said recovery was going to be an easy journey right? Here is what happened to me a while back. When we moved from So. Oregon, to here in Glendale, Arizona,…it was a very traumatic move for me in many ways. I had to adopt out my 2 baby kitties, actually my good friend who has a mini 3 acre ranch took them for us, but it was traumatic for me. Also the 3 day ride in the car was also a traumatic event for me, and had to stay a wee bit extra medicated with my psych meds for the long trip, as I suffer from Bipolar depression, mild PTSD, and Agoraphobia with panic, so need I say more? When we finally got her to AZ we were living with my husbands siblings until we could move back to Oregon. Well, there was SO much DRAMA and arguing that I was having 5 panic attacks a Week!!

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Increase*

“But the thing about remembering is that you don’t forget.”

― Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried

While addiction is viewed in most corners of the treatment and recovery communities (including the American Society of Addiction Medicine)  as a chronic and relapsing brain disease,  as I have pointed out in previous posts, this is usually a  difficult idea for families and friend of addicts to accept.  It is particularly hard when relapse occurs after a long period of sobriety.  Loved ones wonder how   a loss of control can  occur when life has been normal and predictable   for an extended period of time.  It seems as though the addict made a terrible choice, with no thought at all about the impact such an eventful decision would have on everyone else.  Is that the case?   Yet another complicated question, but it is important to understand that, even after extended periods of sobriety and stability,  brain structure and brain chemistry still matter. (Please continue reading)

Animal studies and imaging studies of the human brain have taught us that all natural reinforcerssuch as food and sex, and all psychoactive drugs  increase the production of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, which is a structure in the basal forebrain sometimes referred to as the brain’s“pleasure center”.  When this part of the brain receives  a massive  hit of dopamine from the ingestion of a drug, the user feels high, and the experience of this huge reward constitutes  a powerful learning experience. Repeated experiences of intense reward eventually make other parts of life far less interesting and important to the brain than the pursuit and use of addictive substances and activities. Moreover  and very importantly, the flow of dopamine to the nucleus accumbens  increases not only when the addict is using a drug, but when the addict’s brain anticipates receiving it because it is coming into contact with cues that are associated with use.  This is why 12-step programs remind people in recovery to avoid “slippery people places and things”. Those slippery entities are paving the way to relapse by priming the brain with a dopamine rush.

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Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

When most people think of a gambling addict, they stereotypically think of a 30-40 year old white male. However, more than half of the reported cases of gambling problems in the US are actually teens. In actuality, teens develop gambling addictions 2-4 times more than adults.

According to research, there are some people that are at a higher risk of developing an addiction to gambling. Within this category are teens who have a desire for taking risks, with impulse control issues. Teens who begin gambling at such an early age are at a much higher risk of becoming a gambling addict as adults.

How Teen Gambling Addictions Destroy Relationships

Teen gambling problems have a major effect school, home life, family and other personal relationships. Compulsive gamblers often experience mood swings, health problems, depression, stress and anxiety. Some have even been known to contemplate suicide, as addictions can be very overwhelming for teens.

Teens with compulsive gambling issues have a tendency to do whatever it takes to get money. They often steal from family and friends. This puts them at a higher risk of committing crimes, especially felonies, as a means of supporting their habit.

Pathological gamblers can be exhausting to their loved ones, who must watch them at all times. These teens will drain parents' bank accounts and max their credit cards out. They'll sell all of the possessions, as well as those of others to get the money they need to go out and gamble.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

I am a sober mom in recovery. I got sober in 1999, seven years before my son was born. I do not take that fact for granted. I got sober because I had to save my life and it greatly benefited all of my family. I know what addiction does to the person afflicted with it and I also know how it destroys families.

I am extremely grateful that my son does not know how I appear, think or act under the influence of drugs and or alcohol. Yes, he sees me mentally challanged on days, but he has never seen me drunk or high. Even if that is the best I can do as his mother, it is better than what happens to the many children who are neglected, abused, beaten and abandoned.

My heart also goes out to the mothers who struggle with addiction and to still other women who had addicted mothers who didn't know how to nurture them. No child asks to be born in a family of pain, chaos and uncertainty. When mothers in early recovery wonder whether they are doing the right thing by being away from their children for extended periods of time (treatment centers are often away from home), I gladly assure them that they have to help themselves before they can help their children.

I have seen many mothers give up on recovery because they can't handle being away from their children. When they don't take the time they need to build a foundation for themselves, they usually falter, return to drugs and their children suffer over and over again. On Mother's Day, or any day for that matter, there is no greater gift an addict can offer than a commitment to self-love.

If it wasn't for my recovery program, which includes a program of action, a fellowship, service, prayer and gratitude, I couldn't be the mother or daughter I am today. Sobriety has given me the ability to get out of my own way and enjoy all the gifts in my life. Sobriety has enabled me to see the gifts and sobriety has enabled me to be a gift to others.

I know many a wonderful woman who has shared nightmarish stories about the way they failed as mothers due to their addiction. Before recovery, these women lived to drink and cared little if they left their kids alone, neglected, abused or harmed. After recovery, these women had the courage to face the truth, change their actions and demonstate to their children they care to live better. Their families welcome them back and often these same women become pillars of society. Those unfamiliar with their addicted histories would be utterly surprised to learn that the same awful woman in the newspaper who drove her kids drunk is the same woman running their PTA!

It can and does happen! If you are a mother with addiciton, don't give up before the miracle. There is a way out and we are here to help you. Your life depends on it and so do your children.

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Posted by on in Other Addictions

 

How much time is to much spent online?

Created by : Liahona Academy

 

 

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Posted by on in Other Addictions

According to a Pew Internet & American Life Project report, almost 25% of all teens between 14 to 17 years old had smartphones in 2012. Those numbers have surely increased since then.

Many parents have no idea just how dangerous smartphones can be to the safety of their teens. They use them to “check-in” all over town, letting strangers know where they are at any given time. Oftentimes, they will text and drive, taking chances with their lives and others on the road.

And, these dangers are just the tip of the iceberg. So, before you allow your child to have a smartphone, you need to establish some important ground rules first.

4 Tips for Keeping Teens with Smartphones Safe

1) No Check-Ins Allowed

Foursquare and Facebook check-ins may seem cool. But, for teens, they can be ways for predators to keep tabs on your kids’ locations. Yes, it may be reasonable for your child to want you, their other family and friends to know they’re at a local hangout, basketball game or concert. But, is this really information you want strangers knowing too?

It’s important that your child’s Facebook privacy settings restrict who’s allowed to see this information. This helps protect them from stalkers and predators. However, when it comes foursquare and similar apps, they’re often Twitter co-mingled. That means that just about anyone “following” the can discover their whereabouts.

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Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello and Welcome Recovery Friends,

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It's been awhile since I have blogged a post here that's NOT reblogged from my own recovery blog. One of the ways to inform, educate, and raise awareness about addicted and problem gambling is to talk about it. As gambling in our society is seen as so socially accepted, the STIGMA around those of us in recovery from this disease is growing. Also growing is the sheer numbers of those turning into "problem & addicted gamblers" as well.

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What also has changed is the type of people who are becoming problem or addicted gamblers, and quite frankly I'm shocked at the continuing rise of suicides as well.
The first group who are being touched by addicted gambling is Your College age students and teens. Some of what I will share in facts and statistics comes from a few websites, and are good friends. The caring folks from Northstar Problem Gambling Alliance has done some god research about problem gambling...
http://www.northstarproblemgambling.org
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Problem gambling also known as gambling addiction or compulsive gambling, is defined as the urge to gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop
. It’s estimated that approximately 160,000 to 214,000 Minnesotans struggle with this addictive disorder, which can destroy lives, threaten family relationships and empty retirement savings.
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Virtually anyone – men or women, young or old, from every religion, race and socio-economic background – can be at risk for developing a gambling problem. They can play the horses, slots, the lottery, pull-tabs, cards and bingo.

It is estimated that one to two percent of Minnesotans meet the diagnostic criteria for compulsive gambling. Another one to two percent experience problems related to their gambling behaviors.

The most serious form of problem gambling is pathological gambling, the essential feature of which is “persistent and recurrent maladaptive behavior that disrupts personal, family or vocational pursuits.” (American Psychiatric Association – DSM-IV)

Compulsive gambling can result in social, emotional and financial devastation, including loss of relationships, residence, emotional or physical health, and career or educational opportunities.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction


Kintsukuroi is the Japanese art of fixing broken pottery through the use of a lacquer resin sprinkled with gold powder to mend the broken pieces back together.  At some point in the 15th Century, the Japanese started to employ this technique.  Collectors everywhere started to clamor after these repaired pieces because they were seen to be much more beautiful than the originals.

Kintsukuroi artists became known not so much for their ability to make things as good as new, but instead to render them better than new.  The piece is considered more beautiful for having been broken.  Looking at a potted bowl, for example, as having life force, many would say that the bowl’s “energy” was finished the moment it was dropped or broken. From the Kintsukuroi perspective the true life of the bowl actually began the moment it was dropped.

Such is the case for people on the path of recovery from addiction.  My dear friend Nate puts it like this, “We come to this path shattered, fragmented pieces of ourselves.  The actions and substances we have taken in an effort to feel whole and complete are the very things that have left us in this broken state. We need to find something that will actually mend the broken pieces. Something real. Something powerful.”

kintsukuroi2What is to be our golden lacquer?  We are put back together using the gold powder of the 12-Steps, yoga, meditation, connection with a higher power and being of service to others.  These are the elements that make up the beautiful golden lacquer of the path of recovery.  When we use these tools as the golden glue in which to mend our broken pieces, something incredible happens. We become transformed, not just into the entity we once were, but into an entirely new being more beautiful than what the original could have been.

Gold+Dish2When we look in the mirror, our cracks are still there, filled in now with unique golden lines.  We see them more clearly.  We know where we have been and we are better now for having been there.  We have been fragile like a china doll.  ”Just a little nervous from the fall,” is how Robert Hunter put it.  In recovery, we have combined our fragility with resilience and love to find a life of such richness that before we could never have imagined…A powerful lesson for us all on the difficult and magical path of recovery.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Hello my name is Cathryn Kemp and I became addicted to my prescription painkillers following a severe, life-threatening illness.

Despite years in hospital, and an addiction which pretty much destroyed my life and relationships, I consider myself one of the lucky ones.

I survived many attacks of acute pancreatitis, I survived a terrifying descent into full-blown addiction to fentanyl lozenges, and I survived the withdrawal process in rehab.

I lost pretty much everything along the way, my relationships, my self-respect, my home, dignity and nearly my family.

As a result, and because I wanted to reach others who have found themselves in the terrible prison of pain and addiction, I wrote my book Painkiller Addict: From Wreckage To Redemption.

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