Addiction Recovery Blog

Addictionland - Addiction Recover Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in recovery

Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello Addictionland Recovery Friends & Visitors,


So my time here as *The Guest Expert Blogger* for "Gambling Addiction" is coming to a close. So I wanted to take this time to say to all of you who came by my blog here this past Month, a very BIG THANK YOU, for your emails, and your wonderful recovery support! I hope I was able to share info, and educate all who came and took the time to read what I had to say about "Compulsive Addicted Gambling" the disease. Many still just don't see it that way, and is why there is such *STIGMA* around those in recovery from this CUNNING illness & addiction.


Always know you can stop by my own "Recovery Blog" at: http://CatherineLyonAddictedToDimes.wordpress.com and check out my *Recovery Resources Page* as well as my Book/Writer Blog at: http://www.simplesite.com/CatherineLyonAddictedToDimes
where I show case *FANTASTIC* recovery books, reads, authors, and writers. Along with Featured Stories, Book Reviews, and Guest Authors & Blogggers and websites. I will continue to come here to Addictionland and blog as well. I have learned SO MUCH while being this months Guest Blogger.


For those who are in recovery from addicted gambling, or maybe having a rough time in recovery, there are some "Excellent" websites for help, treatment, and Support. Here are just a few of my favorites I visit OFTEN....


Gamblers Anonymous http://www.gamblersanonymous.org
Safe Harbor Compulsive Gambling Hub http://www.sfcghub.com
Author, Marilyn Lancelot "FOR" Female Gamblers  http://www.femalegamblers.info *Marilyn has 2 fantastic books out here)
http://www.GrippedbyGambling.com and the last website I LUV...
Journal of Gambling issues http://www.camh.net/egambling
FREE TREATMENT Options http://www.myaddiction.com
Every Wen Night on Twitter is #ADDICTIONCHAT @LUV_Recovery 
6pm Pacific time   9pm Eastern Time That's were I am :-)


Always know, you are NOT ALONE anymore. YOU CAN Recover from any addiction, you just have to take that 1st step,"When we admit to ourselves we have a Problem" then reach out for help, someone will be there for YOU.....

MY *SPECIAL THANK YOU TO "Cate Stevens" for allowing me this wonderful platform to share with all of you, my TRUE & SINCERE message of "HOPE" to others. To be able to give you all an Inside Look of the dangers of becoming addicted to something that was intended for *FUN & Entertainment*....but SADLY for some of us, IT IS NOT.

So CATE, from my *HEART* to YOURS, I Appreciated the invite to be a guest here, and call on me ANYTIME if I can be of *Recovery Service* to you and the Fantastic members here on "Addictionland"....May God Bless You All!

Warm Regards,
Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon :-)


Hits: 1791

Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello Recovery Friends & New Visitors,

As a regular person in recovery for almost 7 years, I'm baffled on HOW many different views there are about addicted gambling. It really can be a bit confusing to those seeking Recovery. I say this because as I work on two follow-up books I'm currently writing, I do a lot of research from Blogs, Websites, and rely on Google Search A LOT. If you happen to Google "Facts" about addicted gambling, you get MANY views of What it's about, and How to treat the illness. So I thought I'd share a few of the "OPINIONS" out there about this addiction. They first is from a "MEDICAL VIEW" about this cunning addiction, and in the very 1st paragraph, it calls this addiction a, "Mental-Health problem", which I seem to STRONGLY disagree with.......

*A MEDICAL VIEW*

What is a gambling addiction?

Gambling addiction is a *mental-health problem* that is understood to be one of  many kinds of impulse-control problems a person may suffer from. The types of  gambling that people with this disorder might engage in are as variable as the  games available. Betting on sports, buying lotto tickets, playing poker, slot  machines, or roulette are only a few of the activities in which compulsive  gamblers engage. The venue of choice for individuals with gambling addiction  varies as well. While many prefer gambling in a casino, the rate of online/Internet  gambling addiction continues to increase with increased use of the Internet. Gambling addiction is also called compulsive gambling or pathological gambling.

Estimates of the number of people who gamble socially qualify for being  diagnosed with a gambling addiction range from 2%-5%, thereby  affecting millions of people in the United States alone. Although more men than  women are thought to suffer from pathological gambling, women are developing  this disorder at higher rates, now making up as much as 25% of individuals with  pathological gambling. Other facts about compulsive gambling are that men tend  to develop this disorder during their early teenage years while women tend to  develop it later.

...

Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello Addictionland friends & new visitors,


Sometimes it can be rare to find wonderful friends along our path in life, but can be a Wee Bit rarer when we find Good Supportive friends in Recovery from "Addicted Compulsive Gambling".....So when I do meet new people in recovery, I'm blessed and I cherish those relationships. So I wanted to tell you about my good friend, and fantastic recovery Author, *Marilyn Lancelot*.....

Marilyn and I have been friends for a bit over a year, and I have to tell you, she has always been there for me with a ear to listen, and a shoulder to lean on when I need recovery support, encouragement, and More! She truly has done so much for other women recovering from addicted gambling. So here is more about my good friend, and her book & reviews. *Catherine*

Gripped by Gambling mslancelot@cox.net

Click on: YouTube Video for a glimpse into the addictionAlso available in Kindle edition.

One weekend on my way home from work, the numbers on my odometer read 77,776.7 miles. Because the driveway to my house was circular, I could drive around until the odometer reached all 7's. With each trip around the yard, the odometer added one tenth of a mile.


With my heart pounding, I raced around the circle, spinning gravel into the air while my grand-kids waved from the front porch. When the odometer reached the magic number and rolled over to six sevens, I slammed on the brakes and ran into the house screaming, “Tommie, come quick and see what happened . . . there’s six sevens on the odometer, three for you and three for me.” I twirled around the kitchen and yelling, “Let’s hit the road! Right now!” Anything with seven in it was good luck, street signs, license plates, billboards and even adding page numbers in a book. But this sign was special because it had six of the lucky numbers...

Even as I drove down the streets in Yuma, I watched for cars with license plates with sevens in them, or if all the numbers in the license plate added up to a seven, it meant good luck. Or if there was a twenty-one in the number, I could divide it by three and then I had three sevens. I believed in lucky jewelry, especially my crystals and lucky clothes, like my red blouse...

Your can visit her website for Help, and Information at: http://www.GrippedByGambling.com & Purchase her book at:
http://www.amazon.com/Gripped-Gambling-Marilyn-Lancelot/dp/158736770X


*Marilyn has done some Generous work in many of the ARIZONA STATE *Womens Prisons & Womens Correctional Institues to bring Relief for women who are addicted gamblers. Marilyn was successful in starting *Gamblers Anonymous Meetings* for these women to find Recovery while being incarcerated. http://gamblersaynonmous.org

Her book "Gripped by Gambling" is also HER PERSONAL STORY of addicted compulsive gambling. On her website above, you can really get a look and get INSIGHT as how Women Gamble for many different reasons than Men.

What this woman endured is an INSPIRATION to many of us! Here is my Review on her book, "Gripped by Gambling".....


* MY REVIEW Of MARILYN'S BOOK *

I have to say the I was captivated by the info on this authors book to begin with. It said how a woman, in front of her family and grand kids had police and Federal police came to her home and took her away in hand cuffs!!

WELL, that was all I needed to want to read her True Story and experience of late in Life and finding yourself in the middle of a full blown Compulsive Addicted Gambling Addiction! She shares her time and experience in Prison, and how NOW she helps many other women still in Prison, and they have Gamblers Anonymous meetings to help them all through the State of Arizona!

This book is not ONLY a must read for others touched by Gambling Addiction, but for the Insights it holds about the Disease that the Public needs to be aware of!

Great Job Marilyn, and THANK YOU for your Friendship and Recovery Support!

Now here is one more REVIEW by I feel from a Professional who understands about Addicted Compulsive Gambling ~ and is a review from Amazon/Books.

"GRIPPED BY GAMBLING"

A review by Don Hulen:

Finally! A book about a woman compulsive gambler, an Escape Gambler. Thank you Marilyn. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem and that person is a woman or just plays slot machines you need to read this book. It is real. When I finally got a copy I read it from beginning to end. I am ADHD, and that is the first time in probably 30 years I have done that.


It isn't about flipping coins when you were seven or eight, betting on the ponies, playing dice or the numbers. It isn't about craps, poker or blackjack. Its a book about a woman who couldn't stop gambling. I will say it again, couldn't stop gambling. Every counselor who treats or pretends to treat Escape Compulsive gambling should read this book and have a copy in their library for required reading by patients. I have read many of the books written by problem/compulsive gamblers. I have read many of the articles written about problem gamblers...

The majority are about men who gambled huge amounts and seem to glorify their gambling. Marilyn has written about the pain, the real pain she caused her children, her grandchildren her lover and her sister, her victim as well as herself. Witting about these experiences while pointing the finger directly at yourself is a very difficult thing to do. I know, I can't seem to do it.

I was there in the court room when they slapped the handcuffs on her and took her to prison while her children and grandchildren were crying. I was there when her boyfriend died. I was there when her son died. I was there when her grandson who is now in prison was the lead story on the news. I was there when her daughter finally got straight. I was there when she started a meeting for women (despite adverse consequences). I was there when some of us didn't really accept women into our program but she insisted on coming and changed our program forever.

Its been over sixteen years since I met Marilyn, I thought I knew something about women gamblers, I didn't know anything until I read her book.

Don Hulen, Executive Director, Arizona Council on Compulsive Gambling

*I hope you will take time to Read & Leave a Review fro her on  Amazon and it truly is WORTH A READ!

God Bless All,...*Author Catherine Townsend-Lyon :-)
"ONE BOOK AT A TIME WE CAN RECOVER"!


 

Hits: 4335

Posted by on in Alcoholism

Staying sober requires that we develop skills that further long-term abstinence. While there are many ways to achieve recovery, I would like to discuss Mindfulness as a tool that has been valuable to me and a host of clients I’ve worked with over the last 28 years.

Mindfulness is a concept that talks about the practice of focusing your attention and awareness based on the concept of mindfulness in Buddhist meditation. It has been popularized by Jon Kabat-Zinn. Mindfulness continues to be taught independently of religion.

My sense is that while Mindfulness is a relatively new approach to addiction recovery I have found this concept to have merit. It’s very likely that you’ll find this approach does not conflict with your current program of recovery. I quit using alcohol and drugs over 33 years ago and feel like incorporating the practice of Mindfulness has been very helpful in various parts of my sobriety…..and my life.

While I am certainly not an expert I would like to give you one way to practice mindfulness.

Perhaps you’re at a stage in your recovery where urges, cravings and addictive impulses overwhelm you. Perhaps you feel anxious more than you’d like, or perhaps you’d simply like to add another tool to your toolbox. I sense this method might be helpful to you. I like to explain Mindfulness by way of the acronym S.O.B.E.R:

...
0

Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello Addictionland friends & new Visitor's,

I have shared parts 1 & 2 of "My Gambling Addiction" story done by MyAddiction.com Here now is parts 3 & 4 of my story.....

My Gambling Addiction: Lessons Learned (Part 3 of 4),

By Leanne Hall, Fri, September 27, 2013

In this exclusive interview with MyAddiction.com, Cathy Lyon shares her experiences with gambling addiction and recovery.

*What was your lowest point?*
After both stays in the recovery crisis center in November of 2002 and April of 2006, some of what I had NOT learned was how to actually "break down" the "cycle" of compulsive gambling, piece by piece, and understand – and how to use all of the recovery tools and skills to do that.
At the same time, after my release in 2006, the GA group I was attending was having some trouble within our group. People would gossip about others. We also didn't have many members who had good, solid or long "clean" time. Trusted servants were not "utilizing" all of the by-laws and guidelines from GA. There was no one willing to give up themselves to become sponsors to new members, and no Financial Pressure Relief group meetings were being held. I offered many times to help, and I did, but I couldn't do it all on my own! The reason it's so important, especially for new members, is that we come to GA so in debt and financially broken that we have NO idea where to start on taking our financial inventory.
I had always felt I never really got any financial relief most of my recovery, or trying in vain to stay in recovery, so much so that it lead to my third major event – and lowest point in my life! From April to the beginning of August in 2006, I'd really gotten a good foothold on a clean recovery, but life challenges and financial events turned all of that into a tailspin! Long story short, I had been cleaning homes to make a little money. I was cleaning a friend's home while she was on vacation, and I'd gone home one day for lunch, and my power was turned off! I checked the mail and had a shut-off notice from my gas and phone companies as well. That just put me in panic mode. Instead of working things out with my husband and figuring something out, my old habits and behaviors of my addiction took over. I got into that "have to fix this quick" mindset.

That's why, when you're in recovery, you also need to work on your old way of thinking and learn to solve life's challenges in a healthy way. I hadn't gotten that far in my new recovery. Even though I was not "in gambling action," I'd still used the old habits to try to deal with this financial crisis. I never had that "financial relief" like the GA combo-book had said we would when we stopped gambling. So I did the unthinkable and stole from my friend! When she got back, I could have told her, but I could not bring myself to do it. Just when I got my nerve up to do it, it was too late; she had already called the police. They showed up at my home, asked me about what had happened, arrested me, and off to jail I went. She wanted to press charges against me to learn a lesson.

Needless to say, I did – the hard way. I had a few court dates to go to with a public defender. I was just going to plead guilty; I had to be accountable for the poor choices I had made. This was not only the lowest point in my life, I was so humiliated; people seeing me handcuffed and put into a police car. And if that was not enough, I live in a small town, so of course there was my name in the local newspaper with what I'd done! There went my reputation. All NOT because I was gambling, but worse (and dumb) because I stole from somebody to try to solve my financial problems.
So please learn from me: Make sure you work on all areas of your recovery! I had to learn the hard way. I will say this: Even though I'd not gambled when all of this happened, I still consider the last day that I gambled as Jan. 29, 2007 – my last/sentencing court date. It is my constant reminder of the lowest point in my life....

My Gambling Addiction: Recovery and Life After Gambling (Part 4 of 4)

By Leanne Hall, Mon, September 30, 2013

In this exclusive interview with MyAddiction.com, Cathy Lyon shares her experiences with gambling addiction and recovery.

*Who helped you the most in your recovery?*

An "angel" came to my rescue when I was going through the legal process of my theft conviction. His name is Boyd Sherbourne, PsyD. At the time, he was an Addictions PsyD from the crisis center I was admitted to. Since the friend I'd stole from was also in my treatment program, they were going to kick me out of the program. I'd never met Boyd, but a little problem came up with my husband and my treatment councilor, and Boyd overheard them heatedly talking and asked my husband if he could talk with him in his office. He helped and talked with my husband for a while (while I was still in jail waiting to be processed and released). Boyd told him what had happened and also explained to my husband most likely why I did what I'd done due to financial stress, even though I was not gambling.

Then a few days went by, and Boyd called me on his own even though he didn't know me. It was a God intervention moment. He asked if I was willing to meet with him, so I did. He wanted to help me with support and teach me how to not only breakdown the "cycle" but also learn better ways of handling life challenges in recovery. He taught me how to change the unhealthy, lingering habits and behaviors of addiction. I thank God every day for Boyd taking me on, and he did it a whole year! I can never repay him for helping me get my life back and save my marriage. He helped me stay on a healthy, clean, balanced recovery.

*What advice do you have for other compulsive gamblers?*

We are truly blessed that we live in a world with wonderful technology, and it has turned the recovery process around! For those of you who gamble but are not sure whether you have a problem, you can take the "20 Questions" quiz on the Gamblers Anonymous website. If you answer those questions honestly, you'll know if you're a problem gambler. The Internet has provided "safe and secure" websites for recovery help. There are places with live chat rooms 24 hours a day, on-line meetings, free treatment and therapy. A support group is vitial to a balanced recovery plan. I attend Gamblers Anonymous meetings, of course, but Safe Harbor compulsive gambling hub is another great support community! They offer online meetings, 24/7 live chat rooms and a fantastic "Resource Recovery Room," which includes the "top compulsive gambling recovery sites."

There you will find the top 100 recovery sites on the web, which is how I found this great site, MyAddiction.com. I believe that in order to have a well-balanced recovery, you also need to have a "spiritual" well-being. We reach out for help with such broken spirits, souls and hearts. Not everyone has faith per say. But I do believe in a power greater than myself has helped me return to sanity from the insane, cunning addiction of compulsive gambling. My own quote, which I say all the time, is, "Addiction and recovery have only one thing in common: They are both selfish!" We are very selfish when we are in the depths of our gambling addiction. And you have to be selfish and put yourself first in your recovery in order to be successful! Just remember: No one person on this Earth is perfect. We are all a wrok in progress.

*What are your favorite activities now that you don't gamble?*

I enjoy so many things now that I have not placed a bet in six years. It's like I shared before, having a well-balanced recovery is important. There are activities that I feel are vital to my recovery which keep me from getting too complacent. I enjoy writing, and I love to read all kinds of books. Now that I'm a published author, I have met so many great writers and authors (even a few famous ones!) who have really helped me develop as a writer – along with some good book clubs. I love to cook, and I love gardening (growing flowers mostly). I also enjoy volunteer work; it really helped me fill a lot of the free time I had.

I've been unable to work outside the home for the past few years due to some health issues and the medications I take for my bipolar II, panic and agoraphobia disorders. My husband and I enjoy the first Friday art walk each month in our community, which helps me to get out. In the Summer, we like to river raft and hike on my good days.I have my blog in which I'm able to "visit" with new friends I've made in recovery. I use the Gamblers Anonymous blue and red books daily. I write in my journal daily. I attend online 12-step meetings. I read and post daily on Safe Harbor and still go to some GA meetings as well. I've also started writing my second & third books.

*My Mission today through my Book, and my New Recovery Blog: http://CatherineLyonaddictedtodimes.wordpress.com I invite anyone who may need Support and Recovery Resources from Compulsive Addicted Gambling. I continue my On-Line Journel of my story*......
**Thanks for taking time to read *My Story* and visiting me here on *Addictionland**

Warm Regards & Blessings,Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon

0
Hits: 2597

Posted by on in Gambling Addiction

Hello friends and visitors,

I thought I would *Share* a 4 part Article & Interview that was Kindly asked by www.myaddiction.com to share my experience of what I went through when I was addicted to gambling. Sharing our won stories can be very POWERFUL, as it may help others, and give them *HOPE* that they TOO can recover from this Cunning Disease. Today I'll start by sharing part 1 & 2....The Beginning.......

My Gambling Addiction: The Beginning (Part 1 of 4)
By Jacqueline Pabst, Tue, January 22, 2013

In this exclusive interview with MyAddiction.com, Cathy Lyon shares her experiences with gambling addiction and recovery.

WHEN DID YOUR ADDICTION START?

My gambling was a slow, progressive decline from about 1996 to 1999. Many factors were in play at that time. My husband was in the construction field, and most of his jobs were taking him out of town for long periods of time, leaving me home alone. I was bored and I had too much time on my hands. I didn't come from a family background of gamblers, but I had a difficult family dynamic when I was younger because my father drank a lot. He was in the Air Force, so I just thought that was normal. When I was older, I went to Reno with "the girls" once a year and gambled the way any other normal person would.

I think my addiction really got going when the state of Oregon approved video poker machines – they were everywhere! So, from 1996 to 1999 I started gambling more and more. I also started going by myself because I had so much free time on my hands. That was the start of my addiction being more noticeable in my daily life.


WHEN DID YOU REALIZE YOU HAD AN ADDICTION AND WHAT WAS YOUR REACTION?


I think it was in 1999, when my husband got a new Job. He was home every evening, and I noticed I started to lie to him if I got home late from work (I got in the habit of stopping to gamble on my way home.) And it got worse. I'd tell him I was going food shopping, something that usually takes an hour or so, and I'd be gone for 2 hours. I'd tell him I ran in to an old co-worker and we had coffee. There were just so many lies. I finally realized my gambling had become more then just a fun pastime when my husband and I took a trip to see my family in 1999. I noticed that I would get angry when I couldn't go gamble, and I couldn't stop thinking about the next time I'd get to do it.

My mom planned the whole trip for us, with stops in Arizona, Laughlin, NV, and Palm Springs, CA. The last night that we were in Laughlin, we'd all been out all day and some of the evening. Everyone wanted to go to the rooms, but I didn't want to go. They had been dragging me around all day, and every time I'd get on a winning streak, (or at least I thought), they wanted to go somewhere else. I blew up in front of everybody and confronted my husband. I made everyone uncomfortable, so everybody went back to their rooms.
The next morning at breakfast, my mom said she thought that maybe I was gambling too much, not knowing my husband had made very similar comments to me. So after that trip, I called the Oregon Lottery Helpline for problem gamblers. That was Sept 1999, and the rocky start of recovery.

WHAT WERE YOUR TRIGGERS?

For me, this question is a "mixed bag."
For my own recovery, my triggers always seemed to co-exist with bad habits and behaviors. My triggers allowed me to feel a sense of entitlement. What I mean by this is that when I felt the urge to gamble, I justified my urge by telling myself I deserved to relax, that I deserved a reward, etc. For example, if I got into an argument with my husband, that would trigger negative thoughts and behaviors, which would lead to gambling. By justifying my addiction, I got into a vicious cycle of entitlement, blame, denial and lying, which, of course, led to more gambling. I remember the days of going to my treatment group in GA (Gamblers Anonymous) – just hearing other people talk about gambling was a trigger for me, and I often went to gamble after meetings.
I think a lot of people did that, because a lot of us are in denial about having a problem. I definitely was. I also learned that triggers don't always happen immediately – I could be triggered by a disappointment, but not recognize it until a couple days later.....



My Gambling Addiction: Relapse and Finding Myself (Part 2 of 4)
By Jacqueline Pabst, Tue, February 05, 2013

In this exclusive interview with MyAddiction.com, Cathy Lyon shares her experiences with gambling addiction and recovery.


DID YOU HAVE ANY MAJOR RELAPSES WHEN STARTING RECOVERY?


I had three major relapses. Two were from active gambling relapses, the third had more to do with my general recovery. I'd been so focused on the emotional and illness side of addiction that I hadn't been working on my financial health. It can be very overwhelming when you first reach for recovery...

This question is hard for me.

There is still a twinge of pain for me when I talk about my two major relapses. It was a very dark time in my life, I was using compulsive gambling to escape emotional, physical and sexual abuse that I'd experienced as a child. My feelings first resurfaced after my brother in law passed, right before I turned 30. I went to see a therapist for a while, and I thought I had resolved my issues. I know now that the reason it took me so long to get a real foothold on recovery was because I wouldn't accept the fact that gambling was slowly destroying my life.
I was in and out of a treatment group and GA from 1999 until my first major relapse in November of 2002, right before my 40th birthday. I'd been gambling like crazy! I was fighting with my husband, using the same lies and excuses, telling him it was his fault I gambled, that his work was driving us apart. I was gambling before work, on my lunch hour, after work, anytime I could. I'd tell my husband I was going to a friends house but he knew where I was going. He just let me go, he was tired of fighting. I started to realize that I couldn't keep up with all my lies. I had to pick up the mail before my husband did so that he wouldn't see the credit card bills, I was hiding the money I'd taken from our bank accounts. I felt like I was going insane.

What put me over the edge was when my best friend in the whole world passed away from cancer – a week before my birthday. I was supposed to meet my husband and her family after work, but instead I drove to the Indian Casino. I was there most of the day, lost hundreds of dollars, and I barely remember driving home that night because I was so distraught. All I remember is dialing the phone to call my treatment counselor, and the next thing I knew, I woke up in the hospital in a white room with padded walls. There were police and doctors outside talking incomprehensibly, and then I blacked out again. I woke up in a room at the Mental/Addictions crisis center.

When I woke up, I looked around and saw that my arms and wrists had cuts on them, one very deep, and that I had a few stitches. I ended up staying in the crisis center for 11 days, with the first 4 on suicide watch. While at my stay, my primary doctor and the crisis center doctor found that I was suffering from severe depression, high anxiety, panic disorder, and symptoms of bipolar disorder. So they started me on 3 medications. I always knew I had high anxiety, but I had no idea about the other disorders. While I was there, I worked hard with my addiction counselor, and I didn't gamble for six months straight.

However, I started feeling good, I got complacent, and I decided that I could still gamble as long as I "control" it. This led to another 3 and 1/2 years of binge gambling. I was still going to meetings, but I'd lie through my teeth – I maxed out credit cards, got fired from jobs for stealing and pawned anything of value. Then, we had to sell our home in 2005, just before it got foreclosed. I wasn't working and we moved into a rental home. I felt like everyone in my life was treating me like I was some sort of "mental freak" just because I had to take meds for my mental/emotional well being.

So, I stopped taking my meds and I just kept telling myself that I could be a "normal person." The other thing that was hard for me to contemplate was that I could get "high" without ingesting any substance, that my gambling was actually an addiction like drugs or alcohol. So, with the perfect storm brewing, I was heading down a very dark path. I gambled away the money we got from the sale of our house in three months. I was constantly chasing the money I lost until I was so far gone mentally that I tried killing myself again by taking all of my meds at once.

I gave up on life, on myself, on everyone who loved me – I just wanted it all to end! Once again, I ended up in the hospital and the crisis center and learned I'd never really wanted to stop gambling in the beginning. I was so broken, in mind, body, soul, and spirit, that I made the choice to believe in a power greater than myself. I decided that God wasn't done with me, that he would show me my true purpose. I truly believe that I was meant to go down this path, and that I was meant to learn from it. And learn I have! ......

**HERE IS PART 1 & 2, as I'll share parts 3 & 4 this coming Week! MY Hope is that someone can benefit from my Story & Experience.**

God Bless All, and Have a Great Weekend!

Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon

 

...

Posted by on in Alcoholism

thinking errorsDo You Make These Ten Widespread Thinking Errors?

There are particular mindsets or points of view that can be counter-productive. These errors in thinking, especially if taken to the extreme, can inhibit the personal growth and development in relationships.

1. All or absolutely nothing pondering: You see items in extremes, everything is black or white. This can be evident or subtle, for instance saying 'He is always late, but I never get angry about it'. This mindset can be that of the perfectionist also. This thinking error is common amongst addicts.

2. Minimizing or catastrophizing: You exaggerate the relevance of modest issues. 'The whole meal was ruined since the desert was not served promptly.' Is this a catastrophe? An illustration of minimizing is taking a substantial problem or occasion and minimizing its value so it seems inconsequential. People often do this so as not to have to deal with uncomfortable feelings or consequences. It is a form of averting from discomfort and confrontation.

3. Overgeneralization: You get a single event and draw basic conclusions that it is universally true. If your date is late you say 'No guys/girls are ever on time'.

4. Minimizing or qualifying the optimistic: If an individual says you did well, you reply by saying 'I could have/should have done better'. These thinking errors are often a result of low self-confidence.

...
0
Hits: 11608 Continue reading

Posted by on in Gambling Addiction
Hello Addictionland Members and Friends,
I thought I'd come by and introduce myself, and to THANK Cate for inviting me as Guest Blogger/Expert for the Month of October. I'm very "Humbled" and Excited.
I hope I can give some insight and give a little education on the dangers of Compulsive Addicted Gambling. My first book released Nov, 2012 and eBook for Kindle Readers this past May. 2013, I shared my personal life story of my addiction and much more. My second almost ready for release early winter will be more on the Disease of Compulsive Addicted Gambling, and how to recover. I invite you to stop by my Recovery Blog at http://CatherineLyonaddictedtodimes.wordpress.com anytime and check out my Helpful *Recovery Resources Pages*....
Through my book Addicted To Dimes, (Confessions of a liar and a Cheat) and my Recovery Blog, I continue the rest of my story, and share Help & Hope to others. I look forward to meeting and interacting with you here the whole month of October and beyond.

Warm Regards & Blessings,
Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon
Tagged in: recovery
Hits: 1629

Posted by on in Alcoholism

keepingsecretsWhen I was newly sober, I was told that we are as sick as our secrets. I incorrectly dismissed this as another cliché, like “one day at a time” or “keep it simple” (both of which turned out to also be true). As I look back on my drug addiction and early sobriety, I can see pretty clearly how my honesty is proportional to my happiness.

Before getting sober, my entire life was a secret. There were superficial things such as the clandestine drug use or the stealing. There were also deeper secrets such as my immense fear, insecurity, and shame. Together, my secrets drove me, creating a person that I didn’t even want to be around myself. I lied to myself more frequently than I even had lied to others, I pushed down every unpleasant thought and emotion, and I had absolutely no genuine feeling of who I was.

Getting sober, I was given the opportunity to come clean; both to myself and to others. Part of the recovery process was to write down these things that I had done wrong, things that I had assumed I would take to the grave out of shame. With some help, I was able to be just partly open about my life. As I shared what I had done with a trusted loved one, I found that he had done many of the same things in his addiction as well. As this reassured me, I began speaking with more people about my faults and mistakes, only to find that my community of sober people knew from their own personal experience exactly how I felt after keeping so many secrets.

As I grew more comfortable, I became able to truly address the secrets I had kept. The deeper secrets came out, and I even gained knowledge of some secrets I had kept from myself. As I opened up, I began to experience a new level of joy and happiness.

Today, I keep a close eye on the secrets I am keeping. I try to be open with the right people. I have found that as I am trying to let my secrets free, I also do not create as many secrets. Not only do I practice honesty, I also practice behavior that I would not be ashamed of.

...
0

Posted by on in Uncategorized
Hello Friends,
I'm looking forward to being a Guest Expert Blogger come October 2013. But right now my Life has been turned Upside Down.....We are in the middle of having to relocate from So. Oregon to Glendale Arizona! *YUK*! I don't DO HOT weather! So that is why I have not posted in w while. I do however have a *Dear Diary-Life change at 50 in Recovery* going on my Recovery Blog, so if you want the latest SCOOP, I have my first 6 page entries up Now. My Recovery Link is:
http://CatherineLyonaddictedtodimes.wordpress.com So come on by anytime and see what the past 4weeks have been like for ME!! BUT.....MY RECOVERY and MY SENSE OF HUMOR IS IN TACT!!...LOL....I'll see ya all on the FLIP SIDE from ARIZONA! God Bless! Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon
0
Hits: 2283


website by DesignSpinner.com | © Addictionland LLC