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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Are people on Suboxone sober? With the opioid epidemic raging, the battle against heroin and opiate addiction continues to increase. The number of people entering treatment for opioid dependency continues to rise. The way the addiction industry, doctors, psychiatrists, and detoxes treat opioid addiction has shifted in the last decade.

The trend is leaning towards Medication-Assisted Treatment, specifically replacement therapy. Methadone, which has been around for decades, has been controversial in its effectiveness. Studies and results focusing on the long-term results of Methadone on abstinence from other opioids have varied. Arguments exists as well about whether Methadone can be abused or used to “get high”.

Two Sides to the Issue

This posts deals specifically about Buprenorphine, commonly prescribed as Suboxone or Subutex, and the questions it raises about medication and sobriety. As with most ‘controversial’ topics, there are two sides to the issue. First I will explain the stringent or sobriety purists view on people taking Suboxone. There are indeed people and members of 12 step groups who will claim that people on medication-assisted treatment, such as Buprenorphine are not sober. This has caused tension between addiction specialists, chronic pain patients, and recovery programs. Here is why some may believe that people taking Suboxone or Subutex are not actually sober.

Not Sober?

(Caution: These are not my own, nor NewBridge Recovery’s, personal opinions, and the views presented here are gathered from various outside sources) In the strictest sense of the word, sobriety is the continued absence of any psychoactive drug usage. Now Buprenorphine or Suboxone is a narcotic drug, as recognized by the medical and health community. It is a controlled substance and has a “high risk for addiction and dependence”. To be more specific, it is a partial opioid agonist, which means it affects the brain in many of the same ways that other narcotic opioids like hydrocodone and heroin do.

Human figure made out of pills running in fear from a monster made of pills. The monster is symbolic of the epidemic of overmedication, addiction to pain medications and the stronghold of pharmaceutical companies. Commentary on doctors’ willingness to prescribe drugs even when not necessary. Could show breaking free from the addiction.

Medications Can Lead to Mental and Physical Dependency

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/spotlight-buprenorphine-patches/ 

Belonging to the family of medications used to assist opioid addiction, Buprenorphine is a increasingly popular drug in addiction treatment. It is an opioid itself and is used in "Opioid Substitution Therapy", replacing more dangerous drugs like heroin or OxyContin. Buprenorphine Patches are a relatively new form of the drug, allowing patients an extended slow release of medicine. Are these new patches more effective in assisting opioid maintenance? Are there any drawbacks to patches compared to the traditional tablets?

buprenorphine_Purdue_BUTRANS

How It Works

Medical information provided by the companies behind Buprenorphine claims:

Buprenorphine is used to help you keep off street drugs such as heroin. It can prevent or reduce the unpleasant withdrawal symptoms when you stop using such drugs. It is a medicine that is similar to heroin and works as a replacement treatment. Many people choose to stay on Buprenorphine long-term, although some people gradually reduce their dose and come off it.

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