Addiction Recovery Blog

Addictionland - Addiction Recover Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Other Addictions

In the days of my drinking and drugging, resentments were my trusty tool, my reliable excuse. Resentments were my fuel for going on a spree or a bender. In a state of self-pity, it was easy to justify my need for numbing my pains and sorrows. When I got sober my resentments did not automatically vanish, instead it required some dedicated and thorough work to remove them. In 12 step groups it is said that “resentments are our number one offender”, which means that resentments are one of the most common things that keep us miserable and cause us to relapse. It has been said that a resentment is like “drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.” Whether you are in a 12 step group or not, resentments are something that need to be addressed to maintain sobriety and serenity.

What exactly is a resentment?

Simply, a resentment is a feeling of angry displeasure at a real or imagined wrong, insult, or injury. The Oxford Dictionary defines it as “bitter indignation at having been treated unfairly.” Resentments are most commonly against other people who we believe have screwed us over or hurt us. These commonly include family, ex’s, bosses, co-workers, policemen, etc. When drinking, I often took everything that other people did personally. Some of us hold on to resentments that stem back to our childhood or ex-marriage. Other resentments include bitterness towards institutions and principles, such as religion, government, or the IRS. Some of these resentments are more justified that others, for instance if you’ve been cheated on or unjustly fired from a job. Whether the resentment is real or imagined does not matter, both types of resentments are equally deadly.

Identifying and Removing Resentments

The first step in cleansing ourselves of resentments is to identify our resentments. For some people, their list of resentments is a page long and for others it can be up to a dozen pages. The generally rule of thumb is that if something is still causing you to be bitter or angry then it is important to come to terms with. We do not have to write down every person who cut us off in traffic or the bully from first grade, unless it is causing us to still be bitter and ill-contented. Once we have identified our resentments there are a few ways to remove them from our lives. It is suggested that we look for our parts in the matter of the resentment. In matters such as divorce, it is fairly easy to find our part in the issue. Maybe we were insensitive, selfish, dishonest, hurtful, or unfaithful. It is important to put aside what has been done to you and instead focus on what you could have done differently. Once our roles in all our resentments have been identified, we then pray or ask our higher power to remove these resentments. We ask forgiveness and blessings for the people in our life and slowly our resentments diminish.

The principles behind working through our resentments and putting them behind us is about breaking the pattern of self-pity and to stop playing the victim. We learn to take responsibility for how our life has turned out and stop blaming people and things around us for our misery or misfortune. When we take ownership of our lives and our happiness we experience a sense of empowerment and freedom. Those old resentments no longer have a control over us and won’t weight us down with pity. We are freed from the shackles of the past and can focus on what is in our near horizon.

0
Hits: 1984

Posted by on in Other Addictions

Posted earlier by Me @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/meditation-for-the-average-person/

In my experience, one of the most challenging activities for people new in recovery is meditation. The only thing that gives newcomers to sobriety more difficulty is spirituality and finding a higher power. Many of us view meditation as a mystical practice, reserved for monks and clergymen. The truth is that our misconceptions about meditation are often the obstacles that prevent us from incorporating it into our lives. Learn the truth about meditation, and you will discover it is not as unachievable as you may think.

What is Meditation?

When many of us think of meditation we picture a person sitting cross-legged, eyes closed, unmoving. I define meditation as simply purposely paying attention to the present moment and involving intentional awareness of thoughts, feelings, and emotions as they occur. In a sense, meditation is a form of non-judgmental observation. The three primary elements of mediation, according to Buddhists teachings, are awareness, attention, and remembering.

How Do I Meditate?

There are no ‘rules’ or instructions on how to meditate. In other words, there really is no right or wrong way to try meditation. I will offer up some ways that I personally have found  are helpful ways of meditating and others experience with meditation. In the mornings I set aside time, either still in bed or before my morning coffee, for mediation. To begin I close my eyes, not required, and start focusing on my breathing. I take deep breaths in through my nose and slow exhales out through my mouth. Mindful breathing is a technique used in yoga and psychology to relax the body and mind. I then open my mind to incoming thoughts or feelings. When a thought or emotion arises I simply try and trace its cause. Why am I feeling impatient? What am I looking forward to today? The important concept is to identify these thoughts and emotions, reflect on them, and let them pass. Meditation teaches us to become tolerant of all our emotions and thoughts, thus taking away their influence on our lives. There is another form of mediation I incorporate into my recovery. I read a page or passage of recovery literature or a spiritual text and spend some quiet time really processing and reflecting on what I have just read. Reading spiritual or meditative guides can be a form of meditation in itself. In these practices we are quieting the mind and really examine ourselves. People have reported that physical activities such as walking, running, biking, or yoga can be a form of meditation. Sometimes doing exercise can help calm our mind and inspire thought. Whatever way works for you, just remember that meditation does not have to be this formal practice, it is just about taking time out of the day to quiet the mind and examine our thoughts and emotions.

 

The Benefits of Meditation

  • Meditation increases a person’s ability to manage stress
  • Mediation can treat and even prevent depression, freeing the person of their negative thoughts
  • Mediation has been proven to enhance the body’s immune system
  • People who practice mediation report better interpersonal relationships
  • Practicing mediation can help us spot the warning signs of a relapse
  • In recovery, meditation can improve spirituality and prayer
0
Hits: 1604

Posted by on in Other Addictions

Original Posting

A relatively new trend in combating depression, anxiety, ADD, and even substance abuse is music therapy. We know that music is a powerful thing and can bring a smile to your face or a tear to your eye. So how effective is music in healing substance abuse and mental disorders? Can music provide therapeutic advantages previously undiscovered? The following sheds light on some of the new found effects of music, which can help explain the effectiveness behind music therapy.

Breathing and Heart Rate

Listening to calming and familiar music can have serious effects on our autonomic nervous system. This system is in control of functions such as breathing, heart-rate, and stress levels. Music can slow our breathing leading to activation of the relaxation response. This explains partially why music therapy can counteract the negative effects of chronic stress, improving relaxation and health.

Brain Waves

New research has shown that music has a powerful effect on the simulation and sync of our brainwaves. The ‘beat’ or rhythm in music can actually cause our brainwaves to change. According to this theory, a fast or upbeat tempo will inspire focus and energy while peaceful tempos will promote a calming state.

Change Our State of Mind

Another benefit of music therapy is the ability to bring about a more positive state of mind, which can prevent depression and anxiety. Have you ever been frustrated or sad and then your favorite song comes on the radio? Songs that are positive or special to us can cause a drastic shift in mood. This benefit also can inspire creativity and promote more optimistic thoughts.

The Rise of Music Therapy

After reviewing all the wonderful benefits that music therapy can provide, it’s no mystery why music therapy is growing in popularity. Many hospitals and mental health services are beginning to incorporate music therapy into their programs. Music therapy can be practiced alone but is most beneficial under the direction of a therapist who can help with any difficult emotions that can arise. Here at NewBridge we do have music therapy available to our patients. Remember that while positive songs can promote optimism, violent songs or songs containing threatening lyrics can have a negative effect on our psyche and outlook.

0
Hits: 1871

Posted by on in Other Addictions

http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/760-2/

As a Buddhist follower once said, “pain is inevitable, suffering is optional”. This quote sums up the idea that we cannot prevent emotions or events from happening. We do however have control over how we handle them and how much they affect us. Many addicts or alcoholics use substances to numb difficult emotions in order to ‘escape’ or to ‘numb’. I propose ten more healthy alternatives to overcoming challenging emotions.

 

  1. Sharing Your Emotions

As humans, one of our most powerful tools is the ability to communicate and empathize with others. Talking to someone about your emotions can literally lessen their intensity. Often people want to bottle-up or hide their sadness, which can cause the emotions to get worse. So be brave and share your feelings!

2. Express Yourself

...
0

Posted by on in Other Addictions

This guide was written by the parent of an addict, who hoped that as a by-product, the exercise would prove to be cathartic.

Its primary purpose however, is to help other parents who are faced with the pain and anguish of this all too common problem.

I fully realise that every case of addiction is different, but without doubt, common patterns frequently emerge.

Every parent wants to proactively help their child recover from this condition, but often find it difficult to find clear advice as to how they can help. This publication is intended to act as a sort of road map which will help them to navigate some of the problems they may encounter.

If knew then what I know now, I am convinced that my son’s recovery would have begun much sooner, and would have probably been more successful. I freely admit to my long lasting ignorance of addiction, and to my slow learning curve that would have better equipped me to be of greater help.

...
0


website by DesignSpinner.com | © Addictionland LLC