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Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/newbridge-top-ten-benefits-sobriety/

Do you think being sober is boring? Think Again! There are a lot of benefits to living without drugs and alcohol. It may not be easy at first and the benefits of sobriety may not appear right away, but sobriety can be the greatest life you’ve ever known. Based on my personal recovery and the experience of others, I believe sobriety can lead to gifts you may have never imagined or thought possible. Here is my list of the ten best benefits of living sober.

  1. Boosted Self-Esteem and Motivation

It only makes sense that we feel better about ourselves when we stop harming ourselves and those around us.

  1. Better Eating & Better Sleep

When high on drugs, eating and sleeping aren’t a top priority. Sobriety helps us learn healthy habits.

  1. Make Authentic Friends

You thought your drinking buddies were good friends? Sober friends are in another league.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

b2ap3_thumbnail_AdmitAndAcceptBlogImage.jpg

       In The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions it is written: "A continuous look at our assets and liabilities, and a real desire to learn and grow by this means, are necessities for us. We alcoholics have learned this the hard way. More experienced people, of course, in all times and places have practiced unsparing self-survey and criticism. For the wise have always known that no one can make much of his life until self-searching becomes a regular habit, until he is able to ADMIT and ACCEPT what he finds, and until he patiently and persistently tries to correct what is wrong.

        Through daily inventory we can admit and accept that our character defects are a part of our human nature, a part that cannot manifest if we are truly living in the will of God. We are completely capable of understanding, if the proper work on the 12 steps is thoroughly done, that our human nature is in fact defected. We must accept this about ourselves if we desire to be recovered.

       In the program of Alcoholics Anonymous it is often said, "Let go and let God."  The "Let go" part is turning from the incessant prompts of our human nature and the "Let God" part is living in, and thereby manifesting, the will of God.  Living in the raw-natured will of God, our character defects cannot be manifested in our behavior - it is in such a spiritual place that our nature can be perfected as we become the human being that God created us to be.

         Self-survey is a most powerful tool of recovery.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/newbridge-killer-fentanyl/ 

Have you ever heard of a drug so dangerous that a dose the size of a few grains of salt can be fatal? With drug-overdose deaths on the rise, many people point their finger at heroin as the cause. Recent discoveries show that there may be another deadly drug wreaking havoc across the country. The culprit is fentanyl, a prescription painkiller significantly more powerful than heroin and morphine. The real danger is that unsuspecting addicts are abusing fentanyl thinking it is heroin, with fatal results. Cheap, addictive, and dangerous, fentanyl is the deadliest drug you've probably never even heard of.

What is Fentanyl?

A lethal cousin to heroin, fentanyl is alleged to be 50 times more powerful than heroin and over 100 times more powerful morphine. It is a synthetic painkiller that has been around for forty years but has just recently become a popular choice for drug dealers and drug addicts. In 2015, doctors wrote over 6.6 million legal fentanyl prescriptions in the U.S, although these prescriptions are not the main concern for addiction professionals. The danger with fentanyl is that it looks exactly like heroin yet is substantially more dangerous.

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Fentanyl doses are extremely small (Pictured Above)

Previously an uncommon street drug, international drug manufacturers are producing fentanyl at an alarming rate for cheap prices. It is becoming cheaper for drug dealers to sell fentanyl than heroin and they are increasingly mixing the two drugs to cut costs. Just how popular has fentanyl become? “For the cartels, it’s their drug of choice,” Maura Healey, the Attorney General of Massachusetts said, “They have figured out a way to make fentanyl more cheaply and easily than heroin and are manufacturing it at a record pace.” This statement is backed up by the huge spread of fentanyl seizures and drug busts in recent years. Nationally, the total number of fentanyl drug seizures spiked from 618 in 2012 to 4,500 in 2014, an 800 percent increase.

Some of the states most affected include: Ohio, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Florida. In one seizure last year, law enforcement officers in Lawrence, Massachusetts confiscated 33 pounds of fentanyl and heroin with a street value of $2.2 million. In January, the police seized 66 pounds of fentanyl-laced heroin, worth millions, in another Massachusetts city.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

         The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous says, "We have a list of all persons we have harmed and to whom we are willing to make amends.  Now we go out to our fellows and repair the damage done in our past.  We attempt to sweep away the debris that has accumulated out of our effort to live on self will and run the show ourselves.  If we haven't the will to do so, we ask until it comes (a ninth step prayer).   Remember, it was agreed upon at the beginning that we would go to any lengths for victory over alcohol."  It was difficult for me to find the person to share my Fourth Step with and to share the exact nature of my wrongs with God.  However, I did, and in doing so I found a sense of relief through the power of  forgiveness.  Coming to Step Nine of the twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous was somewhat daunting, yet easier, as I then had the experience of God on my side.   The Fifth Step brought a sense of relief - the beginning of a serene life. For the first time since I was a small boy I felt the presence of God in my life.  I knew then that sobriety by itself was not enough, that I desired to be recovered.  I knew that the solution was and is a vital spiritual experience and having a relationship with God in whom I trust. Therefore, I had plenty of motivation and desire to adopt the humility necessary to make amends to the people I had harmed - Step Nine.

 

          I learned through the program of Alcoholics Anonymous not to consider any harm that had been done to me. Besides, it was much easier to do so at that point as I was praying for and forgiving those on my list.  In the Big Book it states, "Under no condition do we criticize such a person or argue.  Simply we tell them that we will never get over our drinking until we do our utmost to straighten out the past.  We are there to sweep off our side of the street realizing that nothing worthwhile can be accomplished until we do so, never trying to tell them what they must do."

       

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/newbridge-obama-confronts-addiction/ 

Our current President, Barrack Obama, has a history of addressing our Nation’s drug epidemic. Recently his concerns about drug addiction have spawned new initiatives to deal with the issue. In February, Obama proposed a billion-dollar plan to fight opioid abuse and addiction. This act highlights the growing concern over addiction, specifically to opioids, that has sprung up across our Country. Previously a taboo topic, drug addiction has really entered center stage with the deaths of famous celebrities to drugs and alcohol, as well as a sudden spike in the overdose and death rate among young adults. Obama’s direct confrontation of the dark reality of addiction should be seen as “a step in the right direction” for drug-abuse awareness advocates and families ravaged by addiction. Find out how Obama plans to deal with the deadly epidemic spreading throughout America.

A New Movement

Historically, the White House has approached the topic of reducing addiction by going after the drug dealers and the drug users. The so-called “War on Drugs” has practiced punishing and incarcerating both the people selling drugs and the people using drugs. Nancy Regan’s “Just Say No” plan to end addiction and alcoholism failed to bring about a decrease in addiction rates. Both programs have failed to reduce drug addiction or to discourage young people from trying drugs. The main result has been a flooding of the prison systems with drug-related criminals, often repeat offenders. In prison, addicts have little access to recovery resources or treatment options.

warondrugsRather than addressing the underlying cause and conditions of the rise of addiction in America, the government has previously utilized punishment and fear to deter citizens from using drugs. Unfortunately, the 28,647 opioid related deaths in 2014, a 400 percent increase form 2000, signal the failure of their efforts. The substantial rise of drug-related deaths, crimes, and hospitalizations has called for a different method of dealing with the situation.


Obama’s speech on Tuesday expressed an alternative way to end addiction. Our President talked about the need for resources devoted to the prevention and treatment of addiction, rather than continuing the “War on Drugs” policies of the last few decades. “For too long we’ve viewed drug addiction through the lens of criminal justice,” said Obama on Tuesday. Rather than go after the suppliers of drugs, Obama proposed “the most important thing to do is reduce demand. And the only way to do that is to provide treatment – to see it as a public health problem and not a criminal problem.” Professional treatment for addiction has come a long way in the last decade, but access to qualified doctors and therapists is still lacking. Basically addicts are dying because they can’t afford or don’t have access to adequate treatment. Obama said addiction has historically not been viewed as a public health problem, in part because it was viewed as affecting “the poor and minorities”. Recent research has shown that the current opioid epidemic is affecting people of every race and from different backgrounds, including affluent and middle-class males and females. The billion dollars pledged to fight addiction signals a new phase in our government’s response to the addiction crisis.

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