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Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @  http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/4-pillars-successful-addiction-treatment/ 

Has treatment failed for you in the past? Having trouble staying sober? This information could make a huge difference… The Four Pillars of Addiction Treatment  are as follows:

  1. A Structured Treatment Program
  2. Medication-Assisted Treatment
  3. Family Involvement &Integration
  4. Recovery Network & 12 Step Support

Observation and experience has proven that these principles are paramount in successful long-term addiction treatment. Each pillar is important by itself, but for the recovering addict or alcoholic a firm recovery needs to incorporate all four pillars. What exactly are these pillars consisted of? More importantly, how do quality treatment centers like NewBridge Recovery provide clients with these tools?

The First Pillar: Structured Treatment Program

Early recovery can be a chaotic, emotional, and delicate situation. A healthy treatment regiment and a stable environment are conducive to recovery. By establishing an effective routine with planned out activities and groups, the treatment provider creates a comfortable and trusting place for recovery to occur. At NewBridge we structure our program to accommodate the individual. As recovery progresses, the treatment structure may change or adapt to meet the individual needs of each person.

The Second Pillar: Medication-Assisted Treatment

As I have written about recently, Medication-Assisted Treatment or MAT has really become an integral part of addiction treatment. Termed the new “Gold Standard” for treating opioid addiction, MAT can help people addicted to various substances. Medicines that reduce cravings and block narcotic effects can help aid in alcohol and opioid addiction. Other medications, non-addictive, can help with anxiety and insomnia. As more medications are developed to assist in addiction recovery, MAT is only going to become more wide-spread.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/addiction-denial/

The disease of addiction is a cunning and powerful force. It can hide in the shadows of other issues and problems, avoiding being singled out. It places the blame on situations or other people and refuses to be held accountable for its destruction. Often times someone struggling with addiction won’t realize what everyone around them sees; that addiction is ruining their life. Breaking free from the bondage of addiction requires a person to see through the disillusion of denial. If someone remains in denial, it is likely they will not grasp the reality of the situation until it is too late. Read about why denial is so common in the addicted person, and more importantly about how recovery starts when denial is overcome.

Roots of Denial

Since addiction is a relatively slow-progressing disease, problems and consequences of drinking or drugging may not appear until decades after it began. Most addicted people experienced some positive experiences using and drinking. Addiction can creep in slowly, like an assassin in the night, taking hold of a person’s life little by little. Often the person is not even aware of the dramatic changes taking place in their minds and bodies. Their families, friends, and co-workers sometimes notice the changes in their behavior and appearance.  So if other people noticed the presence of a problem, why can’t the addicted person?

In the mind of an alcoholic or addict, they correlate positive emotions, feelings, and memories with their drinking/using. To them, alcohol/drugs are a ‘cure-all’ for the stresses or daily stresses of life. It’s a means to relax, to celebrate, to numb out, to escape, to be social, to manage pain, etc. All the negative aspects of their addiction, they minimize or attribute to ‘bad luck’ or someone else. Subconsciously, their addicted mind defends their actions by denying the reality of the situation. Slowly the morals, goals, and aspirations of the person are lowered until the addicted life feels like the only normal one. When someone tells them that they have a problem, they can get angry, aggressive, prone to avoidance, withdrawn, etc.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/marijuana-harmless-addictive/ 

Recreational and medicinal usage of marijuana has increased in the last decade, sparking a debate about the dangers and risks of cannabis. Advocates for legalization of marijuana claim that weed is non-addictive and different from drugs like cocaine or heroin, which have high risks for chemical dependency. Antagonists claim that marijuana is potentially mentally and emotionally addicting, citing long-term cognitive and developmental problems brought on by habitual usage. The various opinions over cannabis differ greatly. Potheads call it a “wonder drug” and point to alcohol as the real problem. Radically conservative thinkers claim marijuana only makes a person lazy, promotes crime, and leads to harder drug use. The truth about marijuana lies somewhere in-between these two polar opposite outlooks.

Fact420

Marijuana en Masse

Not everyone who smokes marijuana becomes addicted. Just like alcohol, the majority of the population can use cannabis non-addictively. Drugs like opioids and cocaine can create a strong chemical and physical dependence in habitual users. Marijuana does not have many of these properties and physical withdrawal symptoms are mild. In this way, weed isn’t as addictive in the traditional sense.

However, the belief that marijuana is completely non-addictive is also a myth. While most people who experiment with pot do not become addicted, there is no denying that hundreds of thousands of people do become addicted. Similar to alcoholism or a food addiction, marijuana addiction seems to arise in a certain minority of the population and presents itself in various degrees of severity. Why does marijuana present a  risk of addiction to certain people?

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/spotlight-buprenorphine-patches/ 

Belonging to the family of medications used to assist opioid addiction, Buprenorphine is a increasingly popular drug in addiction treatment. It is an opioid itself and is used in "Opioid Substitution Therapy", replacing more dangerous drugs like heroin or OxyContin. Buprenorphine Patches are a relatively new form of the drug, allowing patients an extended slow release of medicine. Are these new patches more effective in assisting opioid maintenance? Are there any drawbacks to patches compared to the traditional tablets?

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How It Works

Medical information provided by the companies behind Buprenorphine claims:

Buprenorphine is used to help you keep off street drugs such as heroin. It can prevent or reduce the unpleasant withdrawal symptoms when you stop using such drugs. It is a medicine that is similar to heroin and works as a replacement treatment. Many people choose to stay on Buprenorphine long-term, although some people gradually reduce their dose and come off it.

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Posted by on in Drug Addiction

Originally Posted @ http://www.newbridgerecovery.com/tell-tale-signs-of-addiction/ 

An important part of determining addiction is the ability to differentiate addiction and heavy or problem drug/alcohol use. The main difference is that people grow out of heavy drinking/drug use with age and maturity. If someone has addiction they will never grow out of it. These two things may look very similar and often may not become distinguishable until years of drug and alcohol abuse. Here are some of the unique and tell-tale signs of addiction.

Identifying Signs of Addiction

 

Tolerance: Taking increasingly larger amounts of the drug to get the desired effect. In alcoholics this may mean an increase in the amount of drinks needed to get drunk. In their early 20’s perhaps the alcoholic only needed 5 or 6 beers to get drunk. Now, in their 30’s they regularly drink 10 or more beers to get drunk. 

p2-adicts

Physiological Dependence: A physical reliance upon a drug caused by prolonged and continual usage. Many drugs can cause a physical dependence upon them, for example: alcohol, opiates, cocaine, etc. If an addict tries to stop using a drug ‘cold-turkey’ they can experience withdrawal symptoms, ranging from nausea to seizures.

 

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