Addictionland - Addiction Recovery Blog

Addictionland - Addiction Recover Blog

Treatment Options for Addiction and Teen Defiance

Posted by camryenwalker
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on Tuesday, 25 March 2014
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your teen’s experimentation with drugs and alcohol may be the cause, or at least a trigger, of the defiant behavior?

If so, the time to get control of your teen’s negative behavior is now. Oftentimes, parents try to ignore bad behavior, hoping it will just “grow” away. But, things just end up going from bad to worse. In time, you also end up losing your credibility as an influential authority figure in your teen’s life. And, once that’s gone, it’s extremely hard to gain it back.

Now, throw in the issues of addiction. People can become addicted to just about anything: alcohol, narcotics, prescription drugs, shopping, eating, social networking, internet use, exercising, video games, pornography, and even sex. When it comes to teen addiction, it’s important for parents to take action immediately. Ignoring the problem, or taking a passive approach, will only lead to even more defiant behaviors.

The Myth about Hitting Rock Bottom

American culture, along with various infamous alcohol and drug addiction programs, are sticklers about the “hitting rock bottom” myth. The general idea is that an addict must sink to the lowest depths possible before he/she will accept help. Now, don’t get it wrong. When parents seek help for teen addictions, it’s often the direct result of the family hitting rock bottom, not the teen specifically.

When it comes to teens, however, it’s best that parents get help for both addiction and teen defiance long before teens reach the bottom of the pit. In most cases, teens who are forced into treatment do just as well as teens who seek out treatment for themselves. As a matter of fact, there’s some really innovative technology available these days, related to addiction treatment. So, even defiant teens who are violently against treatment have been known to sober up and straighten up, with professional help.

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Addiction and Defiance, and the Road to Recover

Posted by camryenwalker
camryenwalker
camryenwalker has not set their biography yet
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on Tuesday, 18 March 2014
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According to the program of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem. Yet, this can be very difficult for many teens, who often live in denial when it comes to addictions.

However, no matter how long and complicated your teen’s addiction story is, there are motivating factors behind it. Typically these reasons fall into one, two or all three of these categories:

  1. Avoidance
  2. Escape
  3. Enhancement

How do teen behavioral specialist come to these conclusions? Well, teens who mask their feelings with addictive substances are doing one of the following three things:

  1. Trying to avoid dealing with something which causes them hurt
  2. Trying to escape from something they’re already dealing with, but hoping to avoid continuing to handle
  3. Trying to enhance, improve or heighten something about themselves

Guiding Your Teen towards the Road to Recovery

In the beginning, addictive substances are good at helping with all three of these categories. However, as time goes on, they no longer work anymore. But, now the teen is addicted to the substance, causing increasingly defiant behavior. So, what should a parent do to guide a teen towards the road to recovery?

When it comes to helping others with addictions, famous quotes can often put fear in the minds of parents. Some insist on what experts call “tough love”, an empowering tool that helps parents, and other co-dependents, learn to just say “no.” Then, there’s the famous consensus that a person “must hit rock bottom” before they can recover. Although this is true for some, it’s simply not the case with everyone.

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Substance Abuse And Violence In Teens

Posted by DanBrown
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on Saturday, 01 February 2014
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Teenagers usually consider their adolescent years as a time to try out different things and experiment with what they see others doing usually out of boredom or peer pressure or simply for fun. It is only natural for curiosity to get the better of them as they are young adults with raging hormones and an inquisitive mind. They strive to be cool and want to “fit in” with what they consider as the happening crowd in society and this pressure to fit in is what drives their activities and interests.

Many teens try alcohol, drugs and tobacco at some point or another. Most of them get over it after a couple of trials and move back to normal life, while some get latched on to them and are unable to resist the urge to take them every day. They become so dependent on these substances that they find it difficult to function in their day to day life without taking them. This abnormal dependency is called substance abuse.

Substance abuse does not only affect the life of the user and his family but can also end up becoming a matter of legal concern in the user’s neighborhood. It has been found that substance abuse, if not controlled or treated, can increase the chances of the development of a violent streak in the user. If you or your loved one has been on the receiving end of violent acts at the hands of a substance abuser, you can seek legal recourse against this crime by engaging an experienced dangerous drugs and pharmaceuticals attorney.

What most parents usually worry about is that their child might get addicted to drugs such as cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, marijuana and so on. But what they tend to overlook is that they are more likely to get addicted to substances like alcohol and tobacco which are available more easily than any of the other drugs. Teenage alcoholism is not unheard of and most teenagers will get hooked on to anything that is easily within their reach.

The Link between Substance Abuse and Violence

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Sharing a Foreign Language

Posted by AlisonFSmela
AlisonFSmela
Alison Smela, is in long-term recovery from alcohol and an eating disorder follo
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on Monday, 30 December 2013
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There have been many times in my life when words or phrases came to mean something other than what many understand them to mean.  Off the top of my head I can think of a few examples.

My husband and I communicate in ways often causing our friends to do a double-take and wonder what in the world we are talking about.  For example, I might be in the living room doing something and yell down to my husband in the basement to bring me “that thing next to the big thing.”  Seconds later he hands me exactly what I needed.  We share a language created during our many years of living together.

Another opportunity to share a unique means of communication is in the work environment.  When I was still active in the corporate world, my team of many years knew exactly what each other needed or what we meant by a simple nod of the head or a raised eyebrow. We had spent hours together creating, editing, masterminding and learning to trust one another.  In all that time we eventually understood things without needing to say a word.  When we were in situations where verbal connection wasn't an option, those non-communication actions spoke volumes.  I was somehow comforted by this; feeling a sense of security knowing I was part of something uniquely special.

When I was drinking and rarely eating, there was a lot of conversation in my head which was uniquely special for me too.  I never shared these ongoing internal dialogues with anyone because I couldn’t explain them.  I had a difficult enough time myself just trying to understand how and why the subject matter would roll back and forth like a pendulum. One moment I’d be justifying my irrational behavior and the next I’d be mentally berating myself for having such thoughts.

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*Thanksgiving In Recovery is a day of Gratitude*

Posted by kitcatlyon
kitcatlyon
I live life in Recovery, but my PASSION is writing and blogging to help others a
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on Thursday, 28 November 2013
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Happy Thanksgiving Addictionland & Recovery Friends & Readers,

.

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POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY LINK TO ADDICTION RECOVERY

Posted by CoachCaroline
CoachCaroline
Caroline Adams Miller, MAPP, is an internationally-known coach, author, educator
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on Friday, 01 November 2013
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2. How does positive psychology differ from regular psychology in terms of addiction recovery?

I think Positive Psychology offers a different approach from traditional therapy that focuses more on what you are doing "right" and how to amplify that instead of focusing on what is wrong and what you are trying to avoid.  When you focus on your strengths, particularly in the beginning of recovery, it can feel empowering and give you a much-needed boost of confidence.

Knowing and using your top 5 strengths in new and creative ways (I use the VIA Strengths test at www.authentichappiness.com) has been found to make people both happier and more successful.  Positive psychology also brings in concepts of getting into flow by challenging yourself with hard goals, and then using your strengths to make progress on those goals.

There is research showing that all success with goals is preceded by being in a flourishing emotional state, so I'd also suggest that everyone in recovery learn about the research on "positive interventions" - the behavior/mental shifts you can deliberately perform to put yourself into a flourishing state.  It's important to also understand how to set the "right" goals that will enhance success, not focus on superficial or extrinsic outcomes.

There are also concepts around savoring that can be taught, as well as mindfulness meditation, that enhance self-regulation and reduce impulsivity.  I'm also a big believer in teaching people how to become more resilient, much like is being taught to the US Army right now by Positive Psychology researchers from the University of Pennsylvania.  You need resilience and grit to survive the setbacks and challenges that inevitably occur when you are pursuing recovery, and although you may stumble upon these concepts in random ways, I believe they offer so much hope and practical guidance that Positive Psychology should be integrated at the start of anyone's recovery.

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A Book Junkie Admits All

Posted by glotao
glotao
Gloria Arenson, MFT, DCEP, specializes in using EFT and other Energy Psychology
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on Friday, 16 August 2013
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I have spent the last month unable to tear myself away from streaming a popular TV series that I didn’t watch while it was on the air weekly. There are 142 episodes and I am almost finished with the lot! Some days I have watched as many as 5 episodes. I am annoyed with my behavior and what a waste of time it is. Yesterday I tried to stop and couldn't.

Then it dawned on me that I am using compulsive TV watching to escape because I am going through withdrawal from my reading addiction! I have run out of books that interest me; most of the book stores in town have closed down; and the library is closed tomorrow. I guess that I will distract myself with a few more hours of TV and hope for the best while my Kindle is charging.

I am ashamed to admit that I am a book junkie. I mean the "hard stuff," the paper books, not the audio books. I love to lose myself in a good story or fascinating biography. The feel of turning the pages and the weight of the book is so satisfying. There is nothing like the sense of expectation I feel when I start a 500-page book!

I have been an avid reader since childhood. I remember how happy I used to feel going home from the local library with my arms filled with books. When I gave birth to my son I knew that I was going to have a c-section, so I went to the library ahead of time and made sure I put some books in my suitcase to take to the hospital since I was told that I would be there for up to one week. I knew that I wouldn't be able to get out for a while once we were home, therefore I needed a stockpile.

When I have nothing to read I experience withdrawal. I tend to feel antsy, anxious and sometimes get grumpy when away from my “fix.” My worst withdrawal experience came many years ago, before Kindles were invented, when my husband and I were invited to visit one of his friends who had moved to a nearby city. Chuck picked us up at the airport and drove us to his new home on top of a hill.

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Cravings Anonymous

Posted by glotao
glotao
Gloria Arenson, MFT, DCEP, specializes in using EFT and other Energy Psychology
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on Thursday, 01 August 2013
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Many years ago when Overeaters Anonymous was in its infancy in Los Angeles, members of AA who had years of sobriety were invited to speak at OA meetings. They brought experience, strength and hope to a group struggling to get on its feet. Among the AA helpers was a wonderful woman named Dottie who was an inspiring speaker. Dottie was welcomed at the burgeoning OA meetings and became a friend and supporter of those wanting to be free of compulsive eating.

As the years went by and OA grew, other anonymous meetings sprang up for drug addicts and later spenders and sex addicts. Then word went around that Dottie was starting another new meeting that was different from all the rest. It was a meeting open to any and all people suffering from addictive or compulsive behaviors. No type of addiction was considered more serious than another. It was a meeting where all attendees were practicing the 12 steps.

Soon after this meeting got underway I moved away from Los Angeles so I never found out what happened to that group, but I never forgot it. We desperately need a new support system today that is like Dottie’s since we have become a society riddled with addictions and compulsions of all sorts. People switch from one to another but are never free of the cravings to feel good at all costs.

I recall Betty, the very first client I treated after I was licensed as an MFT. Betty was an overeating, drug-addicted alcoholic. She wanted me to help her stop her compulsive overeating. Then she met her husband, who was a drug dealer, and she dropped out of therapy. She eventually returned, having divorced her husband. She was not using drugs and was trying to stay off booze, but food was a constant battle.

I worked with Betty for quite a while as she tried to kick all three of her compulsions. She never managed to get rid of all three at the same time.  Finally she relocated to another city. I remember one of her letters in which she said that she went to an alcoholism counselor who told her, “I don’t care what you do, just DON”T DRINK!” She wrote that she stopped drinking and immediately gained 35 pounds!

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MID LIFE QUESTIONS

Posted by Cate
Cate
Cate Stevens. Founder of Addictionland.com, has over fifteen years of recovery f
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on Monday, 20 May 2013
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What do I value?

Where am I unfulfilled?

What are my regrets and can I take action on any of them now?

How do I connect with my inner answers?

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YOGA

Posted by Cate
Cate
Cate Stevens. Founder of Addictionland.com, has over fifteen years of recovery f
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on Sunday, 10 February 2013
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When I get still long enough, I hear the message intended for me.  In response to a recent prayer to feel more centered and fulfilled in my life, I was guided to take a hot yoga class. Increase I tried hot yoga years ago when I wasn't getting proper nutrition and wasn't able to continue with the classes.

Thirteen years later and free from all of my addictions, I felt comfortable I was healthy enough to try again. I came to the class with the intention of expanding, stretching and opening myself on a physical, mental and spiritual level.  I wanted to let go of my restrictive, contracted way of thinking and acting and tap into a greater, Higher Resource that could center me and transport me to the next phase of my life.

After only three sessions, I felt the power of yoga. Yoga softened my stance, opened my blocked channels and allowed spirit to flow through me to create a deep sense of peace, purpose and enthusiasm.  I know I will always have imbalances and that is okay.  Yoga teaches me to surrender my uncertainty to the moment, rely on my breath to find my strength, and trust I will come to know all I am capable of doing and feeling.

Namaste,

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