Addictionland - Addiction Recovery Blog

Addictionland - Addiction Recover Blog

How to Identify Signs of A Drug Addiction in Teens and Young Adults

Posted by mattdtc
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on Monday, 02 December 2013
in Drug Addiction 0 Comments

You’ve noticed that your young adult has started to skip out on family functions, stop participating in after school activities, and hands out with people you don’t know a thing about.

Late nights and bloodshot eyes become their norm, and you can’t help but worry that your child may be using drugs. You read about the signs of drug use, like how personal habits lean toward secrecy, how behavioral issues arise, how attention to physical appearance lacks, or how cash problems lead to stealing from family or selling personal possessions.

Even though you see some of the signs, it is still hard to tell if your teen or young adult has a drug addiction. Perhaps it is time to look for outside support as you attempt to answer this question. Maybe some thorough reflection on the risk factors that contribute to drug addiction will help you identify whether or not your teen or young adult has a drug addiction.

Partner up

While it’s understandable that you don’t want the world to know that your young adult may be addicted to drugs, it is a good idea to put trust in the team who knows your child best. You may want to schedule a conference with the teachers, coaches, or school counselors who know your son or daughter well. Get their input about any usual behavior or patterns. Find out about any habits that point toward drug abuse, like skipping class or a steadily slipping in academic performance. If there are family members whom you trust, confide in them about your concerns. Ask them to be honest with you, and share anything they have witnessed pointing toward drug abuse.

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Which Jobs Lead to Substance Abuse?

Posted by jgwhite
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on Monday, 18 November 2013
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Did you ever consider if your job made you prone to drug and alcohol abuse? With 77% of illegal drug users working full or part-time jobs, you have to wonder what kind of effect it has on their work habits. Many drug users admit that high stress, low job satisfaction, long or irregular hours and isolation at work contributed to their substance abuse problem.

In fact, 3.1% of employed adults actually used illicit drugs before reporting to work or during work hours at least once.

This motion graphic will highlight which work places are causing people to stumble into substance abuse a little harder or more often than some others. It will also look at the different areas of drugs that are being used and how much money is spent on them.

 

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The Dangers of Bath Salts - Bath Salt Zombies

Posted by jgwhite
jgwhite
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on Thursday, 31 October 2013
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This motion graphic is brought to you by Clarity Way Rehab
This video is a feature on the newly popular chemical drug, bath salts. It walks you through the side effects and body process associated with taking the drug. Bath Salt Zombies is something to share with anyone you know that might be considering taking the dangerous drug.

 

 

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The Economics of Drug Abuse

Posted by jgwhite
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on Thursday, 24 October 2013
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In honor of Red Ribbon Week, I thought I would post this awesome video infographic that explains how drugs are affecting more than our families and ourselves but also our economy overall. $300 billion is spent on drugs in America, that's enough to solve world hunger!

View the full video here: http://www.12keysrehab.com/blog/economics-of-drug-abuse-video

View the full infographic here: http://www.12keysrehab.com/blog/the-economics-of-drug-abuse-infographic

Tags: drug abuse
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Locating Feelings

Posted by The Easier Softer Way
The Easier Softer Way
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on Monday, 23 September 2013
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Buddhist Singing BowlSitting in meditation last night, I had a rather pleasant sit. Sitting with a facilitator leading the sit, I followed from concentration into open awareness. As usual, my mind wandered. I was able to gently bring my mind back and avoid the judgement that I often have. In the traditional open awareness practice, we were instructed to note where our attention was. The facilitator included the examples of breath, physical sensation, thought, and sound. All was quite pleasant until the facilitator said, "For these last few minutes before the bell rings, put extra effort forth to focus."

As soon as this was said, anxiety took over. Although I was in the midst of a pleasant sit, the thought of ending the sit brought about great emotion. I had been able to bring my mind back and settle throughout the sit, but I began to struggle with the anxiety. It was slightly stronger than anything else I had experienced during my meditation, and my mind followed it for a bit. Bringing it back, I had an interesting insight.

I tried noting that my focus had turned to a feeling. However, it was rather abstract for me to see this anxiety as a feeling. I put effort forth to truly be presently aware, and found that the "feeling" rested greatly in my body. My heart rate had increased, which I could feel in my chest and my arms and my shoulders and neck became tense. Noticing the physical sensation, it truly was where the anxiety rested.

My mind also had a part in the anxiety, but it was far less obvious that it was in my body. When I heard that the sit was almost over, my mind habitually activated, and the anxiety manifested in my body. My conclusion with this experience was that the anxiety rested mostly in my body.

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Meditation as Inventory

Posted by The Easier Softer Way
The Easier Softer Way
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on Saturday, 24 August 2013
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May Peace Prevail on Earth Buddhist Meditation GardensWhen we think of meditation in relation to the Twelve Steps, we often think of the Eleventh Step. However, I have found that my meditation practice has much to do with my Tenth Step. Step ten encourages us to continue to take personal inventory. People do this in a number of ways: writing, talking to a sponsor every night, or by honest self-reflection.

I have found that meditation is crucial for me in my personal inventory. As I meditate sometime during the day, I try to be mindful of whatever is arising. When I feel a tension in my body, I look for the cause of it. It often is anxiety, fear, or worry about the future. My meditation practice has helped me become more in touch with my body, allowing me to use it as a barometer of where my mind is.

Furthermore, when an emotion arises, I am able to deeply touch the root of this emotion. Rather than run from my feelings or wonder why I am feeling a certain way, meditation has allowed me to meet my emotions head on. I am not perfect with this, nor am I able to do it every time I sit. In general, my meditation practice has allowed me to greatly increase my awareness of what is going on within, of taking an inventory.

As emotions arise, I try to take an objective look at them (as difficult as this may be). When I investigate my emotions, I often find that they are dependent upon my karma, my actions. When I don't make my bed, don't call someone back, or tell a small white lie, I often feel slightly off. Before I began meditating, I did not truly notice how these actions affected me. I may have understood the effects intellectually, but had not truly experienced them. Similarly, I notice the way I feel when I act wisely and wholesomely during my day.

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Compassion and Addiction

Posted by dlinden
dlinden
David J. Linden, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the
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on Sunday, 11 August 2013
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This is an excerpt from my book, The Compass of Pleasure.

These days most of us are willing to believe that drug addiction— including alcoholism— is a disease. Still, we harbor a sneaking suspicion that it’s really a disease of the weak-willed, the spiritually unfit, or people who are not quite like us. The comedian Mitch Hedberg understood this when he riffed:

 

Alcoholism is a disease, but it’s the only one you can get yelled at for having.

“Goddamn it, Otto, you’re an alcoholic!”

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THE GOD PROBLEM

Posted by cosmo
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on Saturday, 22 June 2013
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We hear it again and again from new comers to not so new comers, “I have a problem with this God thing.”

This certainly seems like the largest stumbling block for many addicts coming into the rooms and those that will not come to the rooms and the many that leave the rooms.

You hear all types of comments;

“I’m not interested in some religious cult.”

“This talk of God bothers me.”

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ACT AS IF

Posted by cosmo
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on Saturday, 15 June 2013
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How do we change, from the inside out or from the outside in?

“From the inside out,” was the answer of a young man I’m currently working with.

‘How does that work”, I asked.

His explanation was that he must find a way to change his thinking, if he doesn’t do that first then there will be no change in his behavior and actions, he will just go back to using.

I told him it is exactly the opposite of what he described.

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The Slavery of My Addiction

Posted by cosmo
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on Saturday, 08 June 2013
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If it was up to me, instead of saying “My name is Seth and I’m an addict” I would say “My name is Seth and I’m a slave”. Saying you’re an addict or the alcoholic really isn’t that bad when you think about it. Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams are but a few Alcoholics that had very successful careers, miserable lives but successful careers. Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Keith Richards are just three of the many drug addicts that were very successful, miserable lives but successful.

It is easy for a using addict or alcoholic to rationalize their using and to look at the success of these people mentioned above and tell themselves: “ It’s not as bad as they say, being an addict or alcoholic, look at all the famous ones who had very successful lives”. Of course the using addict never mentions the misery, loneliness and the spiritual death that goes along with the success.

On the other hand, no one wants to admit they’re a slave; no one looks up to a slave no matter how successful they are because the very word slave means misery, pain and doing the bidding of their slave master. Well, that’s what we are when we are using, slaves willing to do anything we have to in order to feed our master of addiction. When we are tired of breaking our family’s heart, not being there for our Husbands, Wives and children, we cry out to our master: “Please my wife/husband needs me, my kids are crying out to me, please I want to stop using.” The master’s voice is loud and clear. “I don’t give a dam about your Wife/Husband and your kids, just feed me.” And as all good slaves do, we feed the master. When we finally cry out: “Please, I’m killing myself, if I don’t stop using I will die.” The master says: “I don’t care if you live or die, just feed me.” Of course we listen to our master, we are powerless over his/her demands and we feed him/her once more.

I once was working with a 27 year old heroin addict who loved his Mother very much. I asked him; “What would you do if you walked into your Mother’s house and saw this brute stabbing your Mother over and over?” The addict said; “I would jump on him and take the knife away and kill him.” I said; “Well that brute stabbing your Mother is your addiction and instead of killing him you’re feeding him every day, making him stronger.”

 How can we feed this master when he/she doesn’t care about our loved ones or ourselves? We continue to feed our master of addiction while we die slowly and painfully, all alone at the end. The craziest part of it all is when we were able to break free from our master we went back again and again and again. This is the insanity of addiction; feeding the very monster that is killing us. This is why we need a power greater than ourselves, for without that greater power in our lives we will die as slaves or worse, live out our lives as slaves.

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